The writing process requires both attentive reading and writing. Careful reading of sources and a persons own writing is regular practice of the writing process. Making global changes to the content and organization of your work from the early drafts to the final to improve the out come of the work are the steps to writing as a recursive process.

These are two different intros the first from the rough draft of the literacy archive paper the second the is the intro to the final. My initial intro was said to be too condense and had too much content in one paragraph. I decided the best way to fix that was to split it in to two paragraphs to break it up.

Literacy experiences can be different for everyone. This drives many questions on how these experiences shape the way people approach writing a reading. Literacy Narratives which are personal stories about literacy experiences can help give an insight and try to answer these questions. Literacy experts such as James Paul Gee, Lesia Delpit, Deborah Brandt, and Kara Poe Alexander study literacy and have made many important findings in the field. Alexander for instance did a study on literacy narratives using groups of students and comparing and organizing their narratives to find answers to her questions. Alexanders research and methods are much like what is being done with the rising carin archive. The rising carin archive is an archive of first year college student’s literacy narratives. The archive is able to give a person a larger insight to the variety of experiences that people go through with literacy. The archive gives a researcher the chance to look through a large amount of essays to try to answer some of their questions. Initially reading the archive I came up with some questions that I tried to seek answers to. While reading stories my first time through the archive I wondered why experiences with literacy at home and in school were so different for people? I also wanted to figure out if people’s perspectives on literacy came from more than just past experiences. I strived to find my answers to these questions through more research by reading more narratives in the archive and considering the works a findings of the literacy experts.

Literacy experiences can be different for everyone. This drives many questions on how these experiences shape the way people approach writing a reading. Literacy Narratives which are personal stories about literacy experiences can help give an insight and try to answer these questions. Literacy experts such as James Paul Gee, Lesia Delpit, Deborah Brandt, and Kara Poe Alexander study literacy and have made many important findings in the field. Alexander for instance did a study on literacy narratives using groups of students and comparing and organizing their narratives to analyze and find answers to her questions on what are common tendencies in the narratives. Alexander’s research and methods are much like what is being done with the Rising Carin archive. The Rising Carin archive is an archive of first year college student’s literacy narratives at the University of New England. The archive is able to give a person a larger insight to the variety of experiences that people go through with literacy. The archive gives a researcher the chance to look through a large amount of essays to try to answer some of their questions. Initially reading the archive I had a few questions I wanted to find answers to. 

While reading stories my first time through the archive I wondered why experiences with literacy at home and in school were so different for people? It to occur many times in narratives where the narrator had empowering experiences with reading and writing at home compared to poor experiences at school caught my attention. In my reading of Alexander she brings up the concept of master and little narratives she sees in the students narratives and I wondered if in my readings I could find similar results. I also wanted to figure out if people’s perspectives on literacy came from more than just past experiences. With these set goals I found intriguing results through more research of the literary experts and by reading more narratives in the archive. 

Breaking the intro into two paragraphs made it easier to organize. Trying not to condense all of the information into one paragraph allowed me to have to freedom to get all of the information out that i needed with out making it sound choppy and compacted like the first intro.

I also added a completely new paragraph to the final that was not it the rough draft. In the rough draft in the intro i mention the work of alexander but did not include her work in the body. So I added a paragraph about her work and my comparisons to it.

Alexanders research and work with literacy narratives had interesting results and findings that made me think about my readings in the archive again. Alexander brought up the concept of master narratives which is defined in the paper as “Master narratives as limiting because of their normative, institutionalized, legitimizing, and canonical tendencies.” What Alexander is trying to say is that master narratives are like the framework for all narratives. After reviewing the essays done by her students she was able to point out that the master narratives in the literacy narratives were success stories. When I was going through the narratives before reading Alexander I thought most of the stories as victim stories. Alexander though defines a success story as “improving reading and writing invokes optimistic and future looking rhetoric”(615). With this part of the definition I noticed most of the narratives that I thought were victim narratives had a positive ending looking at the future in a hopeful way. My initial thought was that these stories could be both victim and success narratives. The more I got to think about it though the majority of them were like this. While rereading her description of master narratives as a framework or basis for all the narratives the thought of the master narrative success story might have been forced into the endings of their essays. If the stress of the success story is the only reason it made its way into these narratives that means the narratives were just victim narratives. Whether the optimistic hopeful ending were forced by the stress of the master narrative of the success or if they were genuine there was a clear struggle in the transition from literacy at home to literacy at school.

Adding this paragraph I thought was a major global revision to my essay. I help the intro make senses when I mention Alexander in it. It added content to the paper that brought forth a new idea and finding that I made while reading the narratives.